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IWNL are working alongside all the water companies who provide us with a bulk supply of water to protect against a growing risk of drought and water shortages due to a changing climate and a growing population.

Please let us know what you think.

Your ideas welcome

Although the consultation has closed, we still want to hear from you.

If you have any thoughts, ideas or comments on our revised plan, please pop them in the comments box below and they'll be emailed straight to our water resources team.

We will not use your personal data for any other purposes or share it with third parties.

Shaping your future water supply...

Our Water Resource Management Plan

Every five years we produce our Water Resources Management Plan (WRMP) which looks at how we’ll keep your taps running whilst keeping bills affordable. We always consult on these - you can participate in any active consultation by clicking the link above.

For more information, contact us at waterresources@iwnl.co.uk.

No information has been excluded from our Water Resource Management Plan on the grounds of national security or commercial confidentiality.

IWNL Water Resource Management Plan 2019

IWNL Statement of Response, Draft Water Resource Management Plan 2019

We also produce an annual review of our Water Resource Management Plan to ensure that the plan remains fit for purpose.

IWNL Water Resource Management Plan Annual Report 2020-2021

What we'd do if there was a water shortage due to drought.

Our Current Drought Measures

You can check the status in your area here.

Our Drought Plan

Every five years we produce our Drought Plan which sets out what steps we would take to deal with a drought to ensure we could deliver a reliable water supply.

To ensure the plan is right for our areas we seek the views of our customers and key stakeholders to help shape our drought plan - you can participate in any active consultation by clicking the link above.

For more information, contact us at waterresources@iwnl.co.uk.

No information has been excluded from our Drought Plan on the grounds of national security or commercial confidentiality.

IWNL Statement of Response, Draft Drought Plan 2021

How we use water at home.

With the growing use of modern amenities like dishwashers, washing machines, power showers and swimming pools, it's no wonder the amount of water used in homes has grown tremendously in the past half a century.

Saving water benefits not only the environment, but your budget as well. Reducing your water use means there's less water that needs to be treated - which means lower sewerage charges in addition to a cheaper water bill!

Saving water is easier than you think - why not try a few of these tips and see for yourself?

How People Use Water

People use water several different ways - surprisingly, the biggest culprit is the toilet, accounting for a third of a household's daily water use!

Water Use In The Home

Water use in the home (Legend)
Water use in the home (Graph)

How we use water in the kitchen.

What you can do:

  • Use a bowl instead of a running tap for washing vegetables - you can save about five litres of water each time.
  • Avoid rinsing dishes before loading them into the dishwasher.
  • Only run your dishwasher or washing machine if you have a full load, this uses less water than two half loads.
  • Hand wash woollen items in the sink.
  • Buy energy-efficient appliances and save money on both your electric and water bills! To download a list of the most water-efficient dishwashers and washing machines on the UK market, visit www.waterwise.org.uk.
  • Running the tap until the water is cold enough to drink wastes a lot of water - why not collect it and reuse it in your garden?
  • Fill your kettle with only the amount of water you need.

How we use water in the bathroom.

What you can do:

  • Try not to leave the tap running while you brush your teeth, shave or wash your hands, as this can waste up to five litres of water per minute.
  • Try reducing your shower by a minute, you can save up 15 litres of water.
  • Fix dripping taps - they can waste at least 5,500 litres of water a year! Mending your dripping tap washer could save you more than £18.00 a year.
  • Baths use more water than showers. But if you have a bath, see if you can reduce it by an inch, this can save 5 litres of water.

How we use water outdoors.

What you can do:

  • Water butts are a great way to collect water for your garden. Rain could fill up your water butt 450 times a year.
  • Hose and sprinklers typically use 1000 litres per hour, that's more than 12 baths! By using a water can, you'll help to save water.
  • Use mulch around your plants to reduce evaporation and keep weeds down.
  • Save water by watering your plants at dawn or dusk. This is will reduce the water lost to evaporation.
  • It's ok to let your lawn go brown during the summer months. Brown lawns are eco-friendly and it will recover immediately after rainfall - even the Queen has a brown lawn in the height of a hot dry summer!

Garden Plants

An effective (and visually striking!) way to combat climate change is to have drought-resistant plants in your garden. Below is a list of some of the most tolerant varieties:

Annuals

  • Gazania (Treasure Flower)
  • Poppy
  • Cosmos
  • Mexican Sunflower

Bedding And Patio Plants

  • Alonsoa (Mask Flower)
  • Argyranthemum
  • Bidens
  • Nicotania
  • Zinnia
  • Osteospermum
  • Senecio

Trees And Shrubs

  • Buddleja davidii (Butterfly Bush)
  • Box
  • Broom
  • Elaeagnus
  • Holly
  • Privet
  • Jerusalem Sage
  • Rock Rose
  • Ruscus (Butcher's Broom)

Climbers

  • Ivy
  • Russian Vine
  • Clematis

Perennials

  • Campanula (Bellflower)
  • Echinacea
  • Flax
  • Gaillardia
  • Geranium
  • Sea Lavender
  • Thrift
  • Toadflax

Washing Your Car

What you can do:

  • Use a bucket and sponge to wash your car instead of a hosepipe - running a hosepipe for one minute wastes about 30 litres of water
  • If you have to use a hosepipe, ensure it's fitted with a trigger nozzle. This will stop the flow of water when it's released, preventing wastage.

Find out how much water you are using in your home.

Water Audit for your Home

By saving water, you're doing your part to help protect the environment. Every litre of water you save means that less energy is used for pumping and treatment.

To find out how much water you use in your home, simply download and fill out our
Water Audit Form.

According to the Environment Agency, the average person in England and Wales uses about 150 litres of water a day - see if you can do better!

Advice for leaks and frozen pipes.

Frozen Pipes

Every winter, hundreds of litres of water are wasted when frozen pipes burst. Repairs can be expensive and stressful, but you can avoid them by following some of these simple tips:

  • Know where your main stop valve is - this enables you to turn off the water supply to your house. Usually, you can find it under the sink or in the garage where the mains supply enters the property. If you can't find it, contact a plumber.
  • Keep rooms that may not be used that often heated at the lowest settings. This will prevent your pipes and tanks from freezing.
  • Make sure your cold-water tank and pipes are properly insulated - you could save money on your energy bills too!
  • Repair dripping taps and faulty washers.
  • If you're going to be away for a short time, leave your central heating on a low setting to prevent your pipes from freezing.
  • Have the name and phone number of a reputable plumber on hand.

What to do if you have a burst pipe

  • Shut off the water at the main stop valve.
  • Turn off your central heating to prevent damage or an explosion.
  • Open all taps to drain water from the pipes.
  • Contact a plumber.

Leaks

Leaks

We are bound by law to prevent water wastage caused by leaks on our network and ensure that our systems are as efficient as possible.

Targeting leaks helps us to conserve water, minimise impact on the environment, reduce our costs and keep your charges down.

Our infrastructure uses the latest technology and is designed to prevent leaks, but it is still possible for them to develop. If you spot a leak, call us straight away on 02920 028 711. This line is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

For more information on leaks, please see our Code of Practice on Leakage for Domestic Customers.

How To Spot A Leak

Signs of a leak include:

  • Higher-than-usual meter readings.
  • Damp patches around your property.
  • Areas in your garden where plants continue to grow through a dry spell.
  • Loss of water pressure.
  • The sound of running water in your property when none is being used.

If you suspect a leak, make sure all taps are turned off and any other appliances or central-heating systems aren't using any water. Watch your meter dials to see if they move, or take a meter reading and check again after an hour. If the second reading is higher than the first, you may have a leak.

Repairing A Leak

If you find a leak on your property, call us on 02920 028 711 straight away. If the leak is anywhere within your property boundary, you are responsible for repairing it.

However, in cases where the leak is on your service pipe, we may be able to help.

We provide a leakage protection service free of charge for the first hour on the first occurrence of a suspected leak. Each subsequent hour will be charged at our standard hourly rate (see your area's charges scheme for more information). You can also hire a plumber or a contractor to find the leak.

If a leak occurs within 12 months from when the water supply was first installed in your property, you may be covered by the utility infrastructure provider's guarantee, and any defects could be repaired at their cost. To find out if this is the case, ring us on 02920 028 711 and one of our Customer Service team will be happy to help.

Please note that our detection and repair services are not 24-hour emergency services. In the event of an urgent leak, please contact a reputable plumber.

How we use water at work.

Water is an extremely valuable resource, but many of us take it for granted because we live in a country with a great amount of rainfall. Water isn't as abundant as you many think - but if we all use it carefully, we can ensure there will be enough water for everyone, even in the most extreme conditions. Saving water isn't about using less, it is about wasting less.

Reducing your business water use will not only reduce your bills, but your carbon footprint as well. Saving water is easier than you think - why not try a few of these tips and see for yourself?

Using Water Wisely at Work
  • Find and fix any leaks. If you suspect a leak, make sure all taps are turned off and any other appliances or central heating systems aren't using any water. Do this during a time when your premises are not in use. Watch your meter dials to see if they move, or take a meter reading and check again after an hour. If the second reading is higher than the first, you may have a leak.
  • Fill your kettle with only the amount of water you need.
  • Find out where your wasted water is going and see if you can use it elsewhere - maybe to water your office plants?
  • Educate your employees on water efficiency - you can even appoint someone to take regular meter reading and watch out for leaky taps, etc.
  • Try and use water-efficient appliances in canteens and office kitchens.
  • Repair a dripping tap - it can waste at least 5,500 litres of water a year! Most of the time all that's required is a new washer.
  • You can also consider tap restrictors for your sinks, which can reduce the flow of water by as much as half.
  • In older, larger capacity toilet cisterns, you can reduce the amount of water you flush by placing a cistern bag or a cut-down plastic bottle in your cistern. The amount the bottle holds will be the amount of water you save with each flush. Don't use these in modern toilets though, as it can create the need for double flushing!
  • Automatic flushers installed on your urinals can waste a lot of water - install automatic flush controls systems which do not allow flushing when urinals are not needed.
  • Know where your main stop valve is - this enables you to turn off the water supply in an emergency. If you can't locate it, contact a plumber.
  • Make sure your property's tanks and pipes are properly insulated - you could save money on your energy bills too!
  • Have the name and phone number of a reputable plumber on hand. You can find a local WaterSafe approved plumber at www.watersafe.org.uk.